Life Science Newsletter – March 12, 2012

In this issue: when body piercings go wrong, new target for lung cancer, nobody’s perfect says Yale, regulating energy balance, pollution and stroke risk, keys to a broken heart, Johns Hopkins on hearing-aid gap, mood matters during pregnancy, masked heart disease in men, breast feeding and obesity, starve a virus–feed a cure, Popeye proteins, an orange a day…, colon exams save lives says Sloan-Kettering, and more…
An Orange a Day May Keep Stroke at Bay

BOSTON, MA — “Eat your fruits and vegetables” is advice handed down to us since we were children, and medical studies have backed this advice.

Full Details

Isolation Can Increase Bad Behavior In Kids With ADHD

Kids with ADHD who are rejected by peers suffer from anxiety and are more prone to substance use and delinquency during adolescence, according to University of Alabama at Birmingham-led research published online Feb. 2012, in the Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology.

Full Details

Threshold Pharmaceuticals Announces Positive Phase 2b Clinical Trial Results of TH-302 in Patients With Pancreatic Cancer

Threshold Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: THLD) announced that its 214 patient randomized controlled Phase 2b clinical trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of two doses of the investigational agent TH-302 in combination with gemcitabine compared to gemcitabine alone in patients with first-line advanced pancreatic cancer achieved its primary endpoint, with a 63% improvement
in progression free survival and a safety profile consistent with previous studies.

Full Details

Hepatitis C, a Leading Killer, Is Frequently Undiagnosed But Often Curable

Hepatitis C virus – not AIDS-causing HIV – is the leading chronic virus infection leading to death in the United States, and its victims most often are baby boomers.

Full Details

Breastfeeding Protects Against Asthma Up To Six Years Of Age

Research by the University of Otago in Christchurch and Wellington has shown that breastfeeding of infants has a clear protective effect against children developing asthma or wheezing up to six years of age.

Full Details

Coronado Biosciences Announces Phase 1 Clinical Trial Results for TSO in Crohn’s Disease

Coronado Biosciences, Inc., (NASDAQ: CNDO), a biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of novel immunotherapy agents for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and cancer, today announced positive results from the Phase 1 clinical trial of TSO (Trichuris suis ova or CNDO-201) in patients with Crohn’s disease.

Full Details

When Nerve Meets Muscle, Biglycan Seals The Deal

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] — A protein that has shown early promise in preventing the loss of muscle function in mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, has been found in a new study to be a key player in the process of joining nerves to muscles.

Full Details

“Popeye” Proteins Help The Heart Adapt To Stress

A family of proteins named after Popeye play an essential role in allowing the heart to respond to stress, according to a study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

Full Details

NW BIO TEAMS WITH THE AMERICAN RED CROSS IN DCVAX® PROGRAM

Northwest Biotherapeutics announced that it has entered into an agreement with the American Red Cross to provide blood collection services through which immune cells are obtained to make DCVax®-L treatments for brain cancer patients.

Full Details

Revising the “Textbook” on Liver Metabolism Offers New Targets for Diabetes Drugs, According to Penn Study

PHILADELPHIA — A team led by researchers from the Institute for Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism (IDOM) at the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, has overturned a “textbook” view of what the body does after a meal.

Full Details

‘Acid Test’ for Cervical Cancer

Women infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) constitute one of the populations at highest risk for human papillomavirus-induced cervical cancer.

Full Details

Hereditary Breast Cancer: Genetic Code Unravelled

Ground-breaking UK-led research has unravelled the complete genetic code of the most common type of hereditary breast cancer for the first time.

Full Details

Exercise In Early Twenties May Lower Risk Of Osteoporosis

Physical exercise in the early twenties improves bone development and may reduce the risk of fractures later in life, reveals a study of more than 800 Swedish men carried out at the Sahlgrenska Academy.

Full Details

Scripps Research Scientists Unlock Evolutionary Secret of Blood Vessels

LA JOLLA, CA, — The ability to form closed systems of blood vessels is one of the hallmarks of vertebrate development.

Full Details

Faulty Fat Sensor Implicated In Obesity And Liver Disease

Defects in a protein that functions as a dietary fat sensor may be a cause of obesity and liver disease, according to a study published in the journal Nature, led by researchers at Imperial College London.

Full Details

When Body Piercings Go Wrong

CHICAGO — Body piercings have become increasingly popular among young people in the United States, especially in recent years.

Full Details

 

Salk Researchers Find New Drug Target For Lung Cancer

LA JOLLA,CA — Drugs targeting an enzyme involved in inflammation might offer a new avenue for treating certain lung cancers, according to a new study by scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies.

Full Details

Benefits Of Hepatitis C Treatment Outweight Costs For Patients With Advanced Disease, Study Shows

A towering $60,000 bill, a year of fierce, flu-like symptoms and a running risk of depression are among the possible costs of two new hepatitis C treatments.

Full Details

Yale Study Proves Nobody Is Genetically Perfect

Every person carries on average 100 variants that disable genes – yet very few suffer ill effects, an international team of researchers led by Yale University and Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute report in the Feb. issue of the journal Science.

Full Details

Regulating Energy Balance

Insights into the molecular mechanisms by which a high-fat diet may contribute to early-onset obesity are presented in Nature this week.

Full Details

Hearing Aid Gap: Millions Who Could Benefit Remain UNtreated

Though an estimated 26.7 million Americans age 50 and older have hearing loss, only about one in seven uses a hearing aid, according to a new study led by Johns Hopkins researchers.

Full Details

Mood Matters During Pregnancy

While pregnant, women pay particu lar attention to factors such as diet and exercise to ensure their babies are born healthy and develop normally.

Full Details

Breastfeeding Reduces Risk Of Childhood Obesity

AURORA, Colo. — Children of diabetic pregnancies have a greater risk of childhood obesity, but new research from the Colorado School of Public Health shows breastfeeding can reduce this threat.

Full Details

Zebrafish May Hold Key To Repairing Serious Eye Conditions

ANN ARBOR, Mich. — University of Michigan Health System research into the mechanisms by which zebrafish are able to regenerate damaged retinas after injury suggests new strategies for one day being able to do the
same in humans – potentially allowing doctors to slow or reverse conditions like macular degeneration and glaucoma.

Full Details

Starve a Virus, Feed a Cure?

A protein that protects some of our immune cells from the most common and virulent form of HIV works by starving the virus of the molecular building blocks that it needs to replicate, according to research published online in Nature Immunology.

Full Details

Antibiotics Ineffective For Most Sinus Infections

Antibiotics that doctors typically prescribe for sinus infections do not reduce symptoms any better than an inactive placebo, according to investigators at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Full Details

Masked Heart Problems In Men Could Lead To Sudden Death

The healthy heart movement in recent years has focused largely on heart disease as the No. 1 killer of women.

Full Details

Researchers Study Mitochondrial Function, Potential New Therapeutic Target for Alzheimer’s disease

(CHICAGO) — Researchers at Rush University Medical Center are conducting an early phase clinical trial of a novel drug therapy for patients with dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease.

Full Details

Mutation Implicated in ‘Broken’ Heart

For decades, researchers have sought a genetic explanation for idiopathic dilated cardiomy opathy (DCM), a weakening and enlargement of the heart that puts an estimated 1.6 million Americans at risk of heart failure each year.

Full Details

Even Moderate Air Pollution Can Raise Stroke Risks

BOSTON — Air pollution, even at levels generally considered safe by federal regulations, increases the risk of stroke by 34 percent, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center researchers have found.

Full Details

Contact us at 212 926-1733 or at info@redingtoninc.com


Comments are closed.